List of galleons of Spain

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This is a list of a few of the carracks and galleons that served under the Spanish Crowns in the period 1410-1639; note that Castile and Aragon were separate nations, brought together in 1474 only through a unified Trastamaran and subsequently Habsburg Monarchy, but each retaining its own governments and naval forces until the 18th century. From 1580 to 1640 Portugal was also part of this Habsburg Empire, but again its naval forces remained separate and are not included below. Not all these ships listed were built in Spain or its colonies:

Galleons[edit]

  • Santa Clara - Captured by England c. 1413, renamed Holyghost de la Tour
  • San Felipe (carrack) - Captured by England 1587
  • Santiago el Mayor (c. 1584)
  • San Martin 48
  • San Francisco 52
  • Santa Ana 47
  • Santa Ana 30
  • Trinidad Valencera 22
  • Nuestra Senora del Pilar 11
  • Santa Cruz 18
  • San Juan de Gargoriu 16
  • La Lavia 30
  • Santiago el Mayor 24
  • Santa Maria de Gracia 26
  • La Juliana (32)
  • San Juan el Menor 24
  • San Cristobal 36
  • Santiago 25
  • Manuela 12
  • Maria Juan 24
  • San Juan 21
  • Magdalena 18
  • Concepcion de Zubelzu 16
  • Caridad Inglesa 12
  • Trinidad 24
  • San Pedro 24
  • Santa Maria de la Rosa 26
  • San Esteban (1607 shipwreck) 26
  • San Salvador 25
  • Nuestra Señora de la Visitación - Former English galleon Dainty, captured by the Spaniards in the action of San Mateo Bay in 1594.
  • Nuestra Señora de Begoña 24
  • S. S. Medel y Celedon 24
  • Santa Barbara 12
  • S. Buenaventura 21
  • San Juan Baptista (c. 1628)
  • Santiago (c. 1628)
  • San Juan Bautista (1635)
  • San Agustín (1635)
  • Santo Domingo de Guzman (1635)
  • Nuestra Senora de Iclar (1635)
  • San Juan Bautista (1635)
  • San Antonio de Padua (1635)
  • San Tomás de Aquino (c. 1638)
  • San Agustín (c. 1638)
  • San Ambrosio (c. 1638)
  • San Gerónimo (c. 1638)
  • Santo Cristo de Burgos (c. 1638)
  • La Visitación de Nuestra Señora (c. 1639)
  • Nuestra Señora de la O (c. 1639)
  • La Natividad de Nuestra Señora (c. 1639)
  • La Concepción (c. 1639)
  • Nuestra Señora de la Purificatión (c. 1639)
  • La Salutación de la Virgen (c. 1639)
  • León Coronado - Former French galleon Lion Couronné, captured by the Spaniards in 1651.

The term galeón continued in use in Spanish sources for much longer than in the navies of Northern Europe, lasting even into the middle of the eighteenth century. However, the design of the capital ship had altered from about 1640, when (like other maritime states) when they had in reality adopted the concept of the Ship of the line.

References[edit]

  • Goodman, David, Spanish naval power, 1589-1665 (Cambridge University Press, 1997) ISBN 0521-58063-3
  • Guilmartin Jr, John F., Galleons and Galleys (Cassell & Co, 2002) ISBN 0-304-35263-2
  • Konstam, Angus, Spanish Galleon, 1530-1690 (Osprey Publishing, 2004) ISBN 1-84176-637-2
  • Phillips, Carla Rahn, Six Galleons for the King of Spain: Imperial Defense in the Early Seventeenth Century.

See also[edit]