Stanhope, New Jersey

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Stanhope, New Jersey
Borough of Stanhope
The Stanhope House
The Stanhope House
Map of Stanhope in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Stanhope in Sussex County. Inset: Location of Sussex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Stanhope, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Stanhope, New Jersey
Stanhope is located in Sussex County, New Jersey
Stanhope
Stanhope
Location in Sussex County
Stanhope is located in New Jersey
Stanhope
Stanhope
Location in New Jersey
Stanhope is located in the United States
Stanhope
Stanhope
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 40°54′48″N 74°42′13″W / 40.913366°N 74.70363°W / 40.913366; -74.70363Coordinates: 40°54′48″N 74°42′13″W / 40.913366°N 74.70363°W / 40.913366; -74.70363[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Sussex
IncorporatedMarch 24, 1904
Government
 • TypeBorough
 • BodyBorough Council
 • MayorPatricia Zdichocki (R, term ends December 31, 2023)[3][4]
 • AdministratorBrian McNeilly[5]
 • Municipal clerkEllen Horak[6]
Area
 • Total2.09 sq mi (5.42 km2)
 • Land1.84 sq mi (4.76 km2)
 • Water0.26 sq mi (0.66 km2)  12.25%
Area rank404th of 565 in state
20th of 24 in county[1]
Elevation961 ft (293 m)
Population
 • Total3,610
 • Estimate 
(2019)[12]
3,306
 • Rank427th of 566 in state
14th of 24 in county[13]
 • Density1,966.3/sq mi (759.2/km2)
 • Density rank293rd of 566 in state
4th of 24 in county[13]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)973[16]
FIPS code3403770380[1][17][18]
GNIS feature ID0885408[1][19]
Websitestanhopenj.gov

Stanhope is a borough in Sussex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 3,610,[9][10][11] reflecting an increase of 26 (+0.7%) from the 3,584 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 191 (+5.6%) from the 3,393 counted in the 1990 Census.[20]

Stanhope was formed by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 24, 1904, from portions of Byram Township.[21][22]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.09 square miles (5.42 km2), including 1.84 square miles (4.76 km2) of land and 0.26 square miles (0.66 km2) of water (12.25%).[1][2]

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the borough include Lake Musconetcong.[23]

Stanhope is the southernmost municipality in Sussex County. The borough borders the municipalities of Byram Township and Hopatcong in Sussex County; and Mount Olive Township, Netcong and Roxbury in Morris County.[24][25]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
19101,031
19201,0310.0%
19301,0895.6%
19401,1001.0%
19501,35122.8%
19601,81434.3%
19703,04067.6%
19803,63819.7%
19903,393−6.7%
20003,5845.6%
20103,6100.7%
2019 (est.)3,306[12][26]−8.4%
Population sources: 1910-1920[27]
1910[28] 1910-1930[29]
1930-1990[30] 2000[31][32] 2010[9][10][11]

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States census counted 3,610 people, 1,396 households, and 958 families in the borough. The population density was 1,966.3 per square mile (759.2/km2). There were 1,472 housing units at an average density of 801.8 per square mile (309.6/km2). The racial makeup was 91.36% (3,298) White, 1.58% (57) Black or African American, 0.08% (3) Native American, 2.33% (84) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 2.63% (95) from other races, and 2.02% (73) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.50% (307) of the population.[9]

Of the 1,396 households, 31.7% had children under the age of 18; 53.2% were married couples living together; 11.0% had a female householder with no husband present and 31.4% were non-families. Of all households, 25.1% were made up of individuals and 6.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.11.[9]

22.7% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.9% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 30.8% from 45 to 64, and 10.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.5 years. For every 100 females, the population had 93.2 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 91.4 males.[9]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $78,625 (with a margin of error of +/- $10,138) and the median family income was $94,545 (+/- $11,809). Males had a median income of $51,974 (+/- $7,042) versus $47,241 (+/- $3,337) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $35,934 (+/- $4,607). About 0.9% of families and 3.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.6% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over.[33]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[17] there were 3,584 people, 1,384 households, and 978 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,913.6 people per square mile (740.0/km2). There were 1,419 housing units at an average density of 757.7 per square mile (293.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.55% White, 1.34% African American, 0.06% Native American, 1.53% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 1.40% from other races, and 2.04% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.05% of the population.[31][32]

There were 1,384 households, out of which 34.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.3% were married couples living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.3% were non-families. 22.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.10.[31][32]

In the borough the population was spread out, with 25.1% under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 34.7% from 25 to 44, 26.8% from 45 to 64, and 7.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 90.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.0 males.[31][32]

The median income for a household in the borough was $63,059, and the median income for a family was $73,203. Males had a median income of $49,861 versus $36,545 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $27,535. About 1.7% of families and 2.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.7% of those under age 18 and 2.4% of those age 65 or over.[31][32]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Stanhope is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government, which is used in 218 municipalities (of the 565) statewide, making it the most common form of government in New Jersey.[34] The governing body is comprised of the Mayor and the Borough Council, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. The Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council is comprised of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[7] The Borough form of government used by Stanhope is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[35][36]

As of 2020, the Mayor of Stanhope is Republican Patricia Zdichocki, whose term of office ends December 31, 2023. Members of the Borough Council are Council President Thomas J. Romano (R, 2020), Raymond Cipollini (R, 2022), Diana M. Kuncken (R, 2022), Anthony Riccardi (D, 2020; elected to serve an unexpired term), William "Bill" Thornton (R, 2021) and Gene Wronko (R, 2021; appointed to serve an unexpired term).[3][37]

[38][39][40]

In January 2020, the Borough Council selected Gene Wronko from a list of three candidates nominated by the Republican municipal committee to serve to fill the seat expiring in December 2021 that was vacated by Patricia Zdichocki when she took office as mayor. Wronko serves on an interim basis until the November 2020 general election.[41]

In January 2018, the Borough Council selected Anthony Riccardi from a list of three candidates nominated by the Democratic municipal committee to fill the seat expiring in December 2020 that had been held by Michael A. Depew until he left office because of health issues.[42] Riccardi served on an interim basis until the November 2018 general election, when he was elected to serve the balance of the term of office.[39]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Stanhope is located in the 11th Congressional District[43] and is part of New Jersey's 24th state legislative district.[10][44][45]

For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Mikie Sherrill (D, Montclair).[46] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[47] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[48][49]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 24th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Steve Oroho (R, Franklin) and in the General Assembly by Parker Space (R, Wantage Township) and Harold J. Wirths (R, Hamburg).[50][51]

Sussex County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year. At an annual reorganization meeting held in the beginning of January, the board selects a Freeholder Director and Deputy Director from among its members, with day-to-day supervision of the operation of the county delegated to a County Administrator.[52] As of 2014, Sussex County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Richard Vohden (R, Green Township, 2016),[53] Deputy Director Dennis J. Mudrick (R, Sparta Township, 2015),[54] Phillip R. Crabb (R, Franklin, 2014),[55] George Graham (R, Stanhope, 2016)[56] and Gail Phoebus (R, Andover Township, 2015).[57][52] Graham was chosen in April 2013 to fill the seat vacated by Parker Space, who had been chosen to fill a vacancy in the New Jersey General Assembly.[58] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Jeff Parrott (R, 2016),[59] Sheriff Michael F. Strada (R, 2016)[60] and Surrogate Gary R. Chiusano (R, filling the vacancy after the resignation of Nancy Fitzgibbons).[61][58] The County Administrator is John Eskilson.[62][63]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,403 registered voters in Stanhope, of which 486 (20.2% vs. 16.5% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 754 (31.4% vs. 39.3%) were registered as Republicans and 1,159 (48.2% vs. 44.1%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 4 voters registered to other parties.[64] Among the borough's 2010 Census population, 66.6% (vs. 65.8% in Sussex County) were registered to vote, including 86.1% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 86.5% countywide).[64][65]

Presidential elections[edit]

In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 1,017 votes (59.4% vs. 63.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat John Kerry with 665 votes (38.8% vs. 34.4%) and other candidates with 25 votes (1.5% vs. 1.3%), among the 1,712 ballots cast by the borough's 2,200 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.8% (vs. 77.7% in the whole county).[66]

In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 995 votes (53.4% vs. 59.2% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 821 votes (44.1% vs. 38.7%) and other candidates with 30 votes (1.6% vs. 1.5%), among the 1,863 ballots cast by the borough's 2,384 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.1% (vs. 76.9% in Sussex County).[67]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 843 votes (52.2% vs. 59.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 738 votes (45.7% vs. 38.2%) and other candidates with 29 votes (1.8% vs. 2.1%), among the 1,614 ballots cast by the borough's 2,458 registered voters, for a turnout of 65.7% (vs. 68.3% in Sussex County).[68]

In the 2016 presidential election, Republican Donald J. Trump received 1,036 votes (56.1% vs. 62.9% countywide), ahead of Democrat Hillary Clinton with 743 votes (40.2% vs. 32.7% countywide) and other candidates with 67 votes (3.6% vs. 4.4%), among the 1,884 ballots cast by the borough's 2,529 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.4% (vs. 72.7% in Sussex County).[69]

Gubernatorial elections[edit]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 716 votes (59.6% vs. 63.3% countywide), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 354 votes (29.5% vs. 25.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 105 votes (8.7% vs. 9.1%) and other candidates with 22 votes (1.8% vs. 1.3%), among the 1,201 ballots cast by the borough's 2,360 registered voters, yielding a 50.9% turnout (vs. 52.3% in the county).[70]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 69.8% of the vote (711 votes), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 26.2% (267 votes), and other candidates with 3.9% (40 votes), among the 1,029 ballots cast by the borough's 2,475 registered voters (11 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 41.6%.[71][72]

In the 2017 gubernatorial election, Republican Kim Guadagno received 55% of the vote (555 votes), ahead of Democrat Phil Murphy with 40% (404 votes), and other candidates with 4.8 (49 votes), among the 1,019 ballots cast by the borough's 2,508 registered voters, yielding a 41% turnout (matching 41% in the county).[73]

Education[edit]

The Stanhope Public Schools serve students in kindergarten through eighth grade.[74] As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of one school, had an enrollment of 303 students and 32.1 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 9.4:1.[75]

For ninth through twelfth grades, the borough shares Lenape Valley Regional High School, which serves public school students from Netcong in Morris County and the Sussex County communities of Byram Township and Stanhope.[76] As of the 2018–19 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 691 students and 58.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.9:1.[77] Students from the borough had attended Netcong High School until 1974, when the Lenape Valley district was created.[78][79][80] Seats on the high school district's nine-member board of education are allocated based on the populations of the constituent municipalities, with two seats assigned to Stanhope.[81][82]

Transportation[edit]

US 206 northbound at Route 183 in Stanhope

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 16.76 miles (26.97 km) of roadways, of which 12.75 miles (20.52 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.24 miles (3.60 km) by Sussex County and 1.77 miles (2.85 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[83]

Route 183 is the main access road that serves the borough. U.S. Route 206 also passes through in the western section and is partially a limited access road (the "Netcong Bypass") which connects to Interstate 80 in neighboring Mount Olive.

Stanhope is noted for its highway oddity. Upon the completion of Interstate 80 (circa 1974), Old U.S. Route 206 through Stanhope was renamed Route 183. A section of Interstate 80 now acts as a traffic bypass around Stanhope.

Public transportation[edit]

Lakeland Bus Lines provides service operating along Interstate 80 between Newton, New Jersey and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan.[84]

Points of interest[edit]

Since 1949, the Patriots' Path Council of the Boy Scouts of America operate two camps at the Mt. Allamuchy Scout Reservation in Stanhope.[85] Camp Somers is a year-round overnight camp for Boy Scouts aged 12 to 17.[86] Camp Wheeler is a day camp for younger Cub Scouts.[87]

The Plaster Mill was part of an iron works along the Morris Canal, which ran through the borough. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1977.[88]

Across the Musconetcong River in Netcong, the nearby Stanhope United Methodist Church, also known as the Church in the Glen, was added to the NRHP in 2013 for its significance in architecture.[89]


Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Stanhope include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Mayor and Council, Stanhope Borough. Accessed March 10, 2020.
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  5. ^ Borough Administrator, Stanhope Borough. Accessed March 10, 2020.
  6. ^ Borough Clerk, Stanhope Borough. Accessed March 10, 2020.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 110.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Stanhope, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Stanhope borough, Sussex County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 16, 2012.
  10. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  11. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Stanhope borough Archived July 29, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed September 16, 2012.
  12. ^ a b Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Minor Civil Divisions in New Jersey: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  13. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 16, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Stanhope, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed September 16, 2012.
  15. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 30, 2013.
  16. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Stanhope, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 30, 2013.
  17. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
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  20. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed September 16, 2012.
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  22. ^ Honeyman, Abraham Van Doren. Index-analysis of the Statutes of New Jersey, 1896-1909: Together with References to All Acts, and Parts of Acts, in the 'General Statutes' and Pamphlet Laws Expressly Repealed: and the Statutory Crimes of New Jersey During the Same Period, p. 263. New Jersey Law Journal Publishing Company, 1910. Accessed October 9, 2015.
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  29. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 719. Accessed September 16, 2012.
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  31. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Stanhope borough, New Jersey Archived January 13, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 16, 2012.
  32. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Stanhope borough, Sussex County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 16, 2012.
  33. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Stanhope borough, Sussex County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 21, 2012.
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  37. ^ 2019 Municipal User Friendly Budget, Stanhope Borough. Accessed March 10, 2020.
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  41. ^ Regular Meeting Minutes for January 28, 2020, Borough of Stanhope. Accessed March 10, 2020. "Mayor Zdichocki stated the purpose of this election for a temporary council member is to fill her vacant council seat. On motion by Councilman Thornton and seconded by Councilman Romano, Gene Wronko was nominated as Temporary Council Member. On motion by Councilwoman Kuncken, seconded by Councilman Thornton the nominations were closed. By the following roll call vote, Gene Wronko was elected Temporary Council to fill the vacant seat of Patricia Zdichocki"
  42. ^ Moen, Katie. "Riccardi picked to fill Stanhope Council vacancy", New Jersey Herald, January 25, 2018. Accessed March 10, 2020. "Democrat Anthony Riccardi has been appointed to fill a vacant Borough Council seat. Riccardi, 28, was the unanimous pick of the council Tuesday and will fill the seat recently vacated by Michael Depew. Depew, who was elected to a three-year term in November, tendered his resignation on Jan. 2 due to health concerns."
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  56. ^ George Graham, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  57. ^ Gail Phoebus, Sussex County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  58. ^ a b Miller, Jennifer Jean. "George Graham Chosen as Freeholder at Sussex County Republican Convention", TheAlternativePress.com, April 13, 2013. Accessed April 25, 2013. "Graham will fill the freeholder seat that New Jersey Assemblyman Parker Space left to take his new position. Space recently took the seat, which formerly belonged to Gary Chiusano, who in turn, was appointed to the spot of Sussex County Surrogate, following the retirement of Surrogate Nancy Fitzgibbons."
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  69. ^ Presidential November 8, 2016: General Election Results-Sussex CountyNumber of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 8, 2016 General Election Results Sussex County
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  73. ^ Governor-Sussex CountyNumber of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast November 7, 2017 General Election Results Sussex County
  74. ^ Stanhope Board of Education Bylaw 0110 - Identification, Stanhope Public Schools. Accessed September 2, 2020. "Purpose: The Board of Education exists for the purpose of providing a thorough and efficient system of free public education in grades Kindergarten through eight in the Stanhope School District. Composition: The Stanhope School District is comprised of all the area within the municipal boundaries of Stanhope."
  75. ^ District information for Stanhope School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2020.
  76. ^ Lenape Valley Regional High School 2016 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed March 10, 2020. "Lenape Valley Regional High School is a comprehensive, academic high school serving approximately 800 students in grades 9 through 12 from Byram Township and Stanhope Borough in Sussex County and from Netcong Borough in Morris County."
  77. ^ School data for Lenape Valley Regional High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed April 1, 2020.
  78. ^ Gansberg, Martin. "Netcong Links Its Problems to I-80", The New York Times, September 29, 1974. Accessed December 14, 2016. "And taxes have taken a big jump because of the need for joining with adjacent Stanhope in operating a regional high school, Lenape Valley, which opened last week.... The reason for the increase is because Netcong had to join with Stanhope, which is in Sussex County, to construct the regional high school."
  79. ^ Staff. "New Jersey Sports Lenape Start Fast", The New York Times, October 26, 1974. Accessed December 14, 2016. "Snyder is the 36‐year‐old head football coach at new Lenape Valley Regional High School, which opened its doors last month to students who formerly attended Sparta High and defunct Netcong High."
  80. ^ Carlson, Joe. "Christmas star is subject of planetarium show", New Jersey Herald, November 15, 2013. Accessed December 14, 2016. "The 53-seat planetarium, the only one in Sussex County, has been teaching students about the universe since Netcong, Byram and Stanhope combined to form Lenape Valley Regional High School in 1974."
  81. ^ Danzis, David. "Bender not running for reelection to Lenape Valley school board", New Jersey Herald, July 22, 2016. Accessed August 31, 2020. "A member of the Lenape Valley Regional High School Board of Education announced he is not running for re-election in November.... The nine-member board currently has two representatives from Stanhope, five from Byram and two from Netcong."
  82. ^ Board of Education Roster, Lenape Valley Regional High School. Accessed August 31, 2020.
  83. ^ Sussex County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  84. ^ Lakeland Rt 80 Newton to PABT Archived 2015-10-06 at the Wayback Machine, Lakeland Bus Lines. Accessed July 9, 2015.
  85. ^ "This is hallowed ground..." (PDF). Patriots' Path Council BSA.
  86. ^ "Camp Somers". sites.google.com. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  87. ^ "Camp Somers - Trailblazer Day Camp". sites.google.com. Retrieved February 26, 2020.
  88. ^ Morrell, Brian H. (October 4, 1976). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Plaster Mill". National Park Service. With accompanying 2 photos
  89. ^ Krugman, Mary Delaney (January 2, 2013). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Stanhope United Methodist Church (The Church in the Glen)". National Park Service – via National Archives Catalog for New Jersey. Downloading may be slow.
  90. ^ Staff. List of post-offices in the United States, with the names of the post-masters, of the counties and states, to which they belong:the distances from the city of Washington, and the seats of state governments, respectively; exhibiting the state of post-offices, on the 1st of June, 1828, p. 113, Way & Gideon, 1828. Accessed November 15, 2015.
  91. ^ Hogan, Colin. "Hidden In Plain View: Interview With Rob Freeman", The Aquarian Weekly, March 16, 2005. Accessed October 9, 2015. "With a new release titled Life in Dreaming having hit stores on February 22nd sitting the band safely on the Billboard Charts at #154, it seems that Hidden in Plain View is anything but. It seems that the hometown heroes from Stanhope, New Jersey have definitely established a name for themselves. I was able to catch Rob Freeman, vocalist and guitarist of the band, to discuss the band, their album and upcoming tours."
  92. ^ Miss New Jersey 2002 Archived June 15, 2011, at the Wayback Machine, Miss America. Accessed October 9, 2015. "Name: Alicia Luciano; Hometown: Stanhope, New Jersey"
  93. ^ Woliver, Robbie. "MUSIC; For Punk Band, Success Counts", The New York Times, April 1, 2011. Accessed October 9, 2015. "The band members -- Chris Amato, 23, bass player of Chatham; Joe Reo, 20, vocalist of Stanhope; Bob Freeman, 19, guitarist vocalist and songwriter of Stanhope; Kenny Ryan, 19, guitarist of Long Valley; Derek Reilly, 18, drummer of Rockaway -- have no qualms about acting in ways that their peers might view as selling out, as long as they get their music heard."
  94. ^ Dave Yovanovits player profile, New York Jets. Accessed April 26, 2007. "Resides in Stanhope, NJ."
  95. ^ Tatum, Kevin. "Owls pleasantly surprised by draft; The Patriots chose defensive lineman Dan Klecko, and the Jets took offensive tackle Dave Yovanovits.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, April 28, 2013. Accessed October 9, 2015. "At home in Stanhope, N.J., Dave Yovanovits was glued to the televised NFL draft coverage from New York."

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