Laurens Jan Brinkhorst

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Laurens Jan Brinkhorst
Laurens Jan Brinkhorst 1981 (1).jpg
Laurens Jan Brinkhorst in 1981
Deputy Prime Minister
In office
31 March 2005 – 3 July 2006
Serving with Gerrit Zalm
Prime MinisterJan Peter Balkenende
Preceded byThom de Graaf
Succeeded byGerrit Zalm
Minister of Economic Affairs
In office
27 May 2003 – 3 July 2006
Prime MinisterJan Peter Balkenende
Preceded byHans Hoogervorst
Succeeded byGerrit Zalm (Ad interim)
Minister of Agriculture,
Nature and Fisheries
In office
9 June 1999 – 22 July 2002
Prime MinisterWim Kok
Preceded byKlaas de Vries (Ad interim)
Succeeded byCees Veerman
Member of the
European Parliament
In office
19 July 1994 – 8 June 1999
Parliamentary groupEuropean Liberal Democrat
and Reform Party
ConstituencyNetherlands
Ambassador of the
European Union to Japan
In office
1 December 1982 – 1 January 1987
Preceded byLeslie Fielding
Succeeded byDries van Agt
Leader of the Democrats 66
In office
8 September 1982 – 11 November 1982
Preceded byJan Terlouw
Succeeded byMaarten Engwirda
Parliamentary leader in the
House of Representatives
In office
11 September 1981 – 11 November 1982
Preceded byJan Terlouw
Succeeded byMaarten Engwirda
Parliamentary groupDemocrats 66
Member of the House
of Representatives
In office
8 June 1977 – 11 November 1982
Parliamentary groupDemocrats 66
State Secretary for Foreign Affairs
In office
11 May 1973 – 8 September 1977
Serving with Pieter Kooijmans
Prime MinisterJoop den Uyl
Preceded byTjerk Westerterp
Succeeded byDurk van der Mei
Personal details
Born
Laurens Jan Brinkhorst

(1937-03-18) 18 March 1937 (age 83)
Zwolle, Netherlands
NationalityDutch
Political partyDemocrats 66 (from 1966)
Spouse(s)
Jantien Heringa
(m. 1960)
ChildrenMarius Brinkhorst
(born 1964)
Princess Laurentien
(born 1966)
RelativesPrince Constantijn
(son-in-law)
ResidenceLeiden, Netherlands
Alma materLeiden University
(LL.B., LL.M.)
Columbia University
(B.Soc.Sc, MSSc)
OccupationPolitician · Diplomat · Civil servant · Jurist · Lawyer · Researcher · Nonprofit director · Lobbyist · Activist · Author · Professor

Laurens Jan Brinkhorst (born 18 March 1937) is a retired Dutch politician and diplomat of the Democrats 66 (D66) party and jurist.

Brinkhorst studied Law at the Leiden University obtaining a Master of Laws degree followed by a postgraduate education in Political science at the Columbia University obtained a Master of Social Science degree. Brinkhorst worked as a paralegal at Shearman & Sterling in New York City from September 1961 until December 1962. Brinkhorst worked as a researcher and associate professor of International law at his alma mater in Leiden from December 1962 until January 1967 and as a professor of International law, International relations and European law at the University of Groningen from January 1967 until May 1973. After the election of 1972 Brinkhorst was appointed as State Secretary for Foreign Affairs in the Cabinet Den Uyl taking office on 19 December 1977. The Cabinet Den Uyl just before the end of its term and he resigned on 8 September 1977. After the election of 1977 Brinkhorst was elected as a Member of the House of Representatives on 8 June 1977 and served as a frontbencher and spokesperson for Foreign and European Affairs. After the election of 1981 Party Leader and Parliamentary leader Jan Terlouw was appointed as Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Economic Affairs and Brinkhorst was selected as his successor as Parliamentary leader on 11 September 1981. Shortly after the election of 1982 Terlouw announced he was stepping down as Party Leader and Brinkhorst was anonymously selected as his successor on 8 September 1982.

In October 1982 Brinkhorst was nominated as Ambassador of the European Union to Japan serving from 1 December 1982 until 1 January 1987 when he was appointed Director-General of the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety of the European Commission serving until his resignation on 1 July 1994. After the European Parliament election of 1994 Brinkhorst was elected as a Member of the European Parliament on 19 July 1994. Brinkhorst was appointed as Minister of Agriculture, Nature and Fisheries in the Cabinet Kok II following a cabinet reshuffle taking office on 9 June 1999. In February 2002 Brinkhorst announced that he wouldn't stand for the election of 2002. Brinkhorst semi-retired from active politics and worked as a professor of Governmental Studies and International relations at the Tilburg University from December 2002 until May 2003. After the election of 2003 Brinkhorst was appointed as Minister of Economic Affairs in the Cabinet Balkenende II taking office on 27 May 2003 and was appointed as Deputy Prime Minister following the resignation of Thom de Graaf on 31 March 2005. The Cabinet Balkenende fell three years into its term and he resigned on 3 July 2006.

Brinkhorst retired from active politics at 69 and became active in the public sector as a non-profit director and served on several state commissions and councils on behalf of the government and as an occasional diplomat for economic and diplomatic delegations for the European Union, and worked as a distinguished professor of International relations and International and European law at his alma mater in Leiden from November 2006 until November 2011 and a distinguished visiting professor of International relations and Environmental law at the University of Lausanne from February 2007 until February 2008. Following his retirement Brinkhorst continued to be active as an advocate and activist for the Human rights, Sustainable development, Climate change and more European integration. Brinkhorst was known for his abilities as a skillful debater and effective negotiator and continues to comment on political affairs as of 2020. He holds the distinction of having the longest active time-span as a cabinet member after World War II between 1973 and 2006 with 33 years, 53 days.

Early life and education[edit]

Laurens-Jan Brinkhorst was born in the city of Zwolle. His parents were Marius Jacobus Brinkhorst (1902 - 1943) and Françoise Laurence Wilhelmina Holboom (1901 - 1981). After getting his high school diploma (gymnasium-B-diploma in Dutch) he studied law at the University of Leiden (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden in Dutch), where he obtained his LL.M. degree in 1959. He also received an M.A. degree in Public Law and Government from Columbia University in New York City. Afterwards he worked at Shearman & Sterling in New York City.

Brinkhorst attended the Christian Gymnasium Sorghvliet in The Hague from June 1945 until June 1954 and applied at the Leiden University in June 1954, majoring in Law. He obtained a Bachelor of Laws degree in June 1956 before graduating with an Master of Laws degree in July 1959. Brinkhorst applied at the Columbia University in New York City in August 1959 for a postgraduate education in Political science and obtained an Bachelor of Social Science degree before graduating with an Master of Social Science in September 1961. Brinkhorst worked as a paralegal at Shearman & Sterling in New York City from September 1961 until December 1962. Brinkhorst worked as a researcher at the Leiden University from December 1962 until January 1967 and as an associate professor of International law at the Leiden University from April 1965 until January 1967 and as a professor of International law, International relations and European law at the University of Groningen from January 1967 until 11 May 1973.

Career in politics and academia[edit]

Brinkhorst served on the Provincial-Council of Groningen from July 1970 until August 1971. After the election of 1972 Brinkhorst was appointed as State Secretary for Foreign Affairs in the Cabinet Den Uyl, taking office on 19 December 1977. The Cabinet Den Uyl fell on 22 March 1977 after four years of tensions in the coalition and continued to serve in a demissionary capacity. Brinkhorst was elected as a Member of the House of Representatives after the election of 1977, taking office on 8 June 1977 but he was still serving in the cabinet and because of dualism customs in the constitutional convention of Dutch politics he couldn't serve a dual mandate he subsequently resigned as State Secretary on 8 September 1977.

Laurens Jan Brinkhorst and Prime Minister Dries van Agt in the House of Representatives on 3 February 1981.
Parliamentary leaders Laurens Jan Brinkhorst and Ruud Lubbers in the House of Representatives on 9 June 1982.

In 1977 he was again a member of the Second Chamber of the Dutch parliament for D66 and in 1981 became the leader of his party in parliament. From 1983-1987 he was Ambassador of the European Community in Japan. After the election of 1981 the Leader of the Democrats 66 and Parliamentary leader of the Democrats 66 in the House of Representatives Jan Terlouw was appointed as Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Economic Affairs in the Cabinet Van Agt II and Brinkhorst was selected as his successor as Parliamentary leader in the House of Representatives on 11 September 1981. After the Leader of the Democrats 66 Terlouw announced that he was stepping down as Leader following a big loss in the election of 1982 the Democrats 66 leadership appointed Brinkhorst as his successor on 8 September 1982. In October 1982 Brinkhorst was nominated as Ambassador of the European Union to Japan, he resigned as Leader and as Parliamentary leader and as a Member of the House of Representatives on 11 November 1982 and was installed as Ambassador, taking office on 1 December 1982. In December 1986 Brinkhorst was nominated as Director-General of the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety of the European Commission, he resigned as Ambassador the same day he was installed as Director-General, serving from 1 January 1987 until his resignation 19 July 1994.

Brinkhorst was elected as a Member of the European Parliament after the European Parliamentary election of 1994, taking office on 19 July 1994. Brinkhorst was appointed as Minister of Agriculture, Nature and Fisheries in the Cabinet Kok II following the resignation of Haijo Apotheker, taking office on 9 June 1999. In February 2002 Brinkhorst announced that he wouldn't stand for the election of 2002. The Cabinet Kok II resigned on 16 April 2002 following the conclusions of the NIOD report into the Srebrenica massacre during the Bosnian War and continued to serve in a demissionary capacity. The Cabinet Kok II was replaced by the Cabinet Balkenende I following the cabinet formation of 2002 on 22 July 2002. Brinkhorst semi-retired from active politics and became active in the private sector and public sector and worked as a senior legal advisor at NautaDutilh in Brussels from August 2002 until May 2003 and served as a distinguished professor of Governmental Studies and International relations at the Tilburg University from 1 December 2002 until 27 May 2003.

In 1987 he became a correspondent of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences.[1] Between 1987 and 1994 Brinkhorst continued his service at the European Commission as Director-General for Environmental Affairs and Nuclear Safety. In 1994 Brinkhorst became a member of the European Parliament, serving there until 1999.

Brinkhorst was also a member of the Provinciale Staten (the provincial parliament) of the province of Groningen for D66, a member of the board of advice of the World Resources Institute in Washington DC, a member of the board of governors of the Nederlands Economisch Instituut (Dutch Economical Institute), a professor by special appointment of international environmental law at the University of Leiden, a member of the Board of Directors of the Salzburg Seminar, a member of the Board of Directors of the International Institute of Sustainable Development, and a professor (on a temporary basis) of international environmental law at the University of Lausanne.

On 8 June 1999 he became the minister of agriculture, environmental control and fishery in the cabinet Kok-II. Afterwards (2002) he became an Adviser of European Affairs at NautaDulith in Brussels and was awarded a professorship in transnational and European Governance at the University of Tilburg.

After the election of 2003 Brinkhorst was appointed as Minister of Economic Affairs in the Cabinet Balkenende II, taking office on 27 May 2003. Brinkhorst was also appointed as Deputy Prime Minister following the resignation of Thom de Graaf, taking office on 31 March 2005. The Cabinet Balkenende II fell on 30 June 2006 after the Democrats 66 had lost confidence in the functioning of Minister of Integration and Asylum Affairs Rita Verdonk and continued to serve in a demissionary capacity until the Democrats 66 cabinet members resigned on 3 July 2006. Shortly thereafter Brinkhorst announced his retirement from national politics and that he wouldn't stand for the election of 2006. After the electoral defeat of D66 he became a minister of economic affairs in the second Balkenende cabinet. Brinkhorst, as well as Alexander Pechtold, resigned from his minister post after the second Balkenende cabinet lost the confidence of parliament on 29 June 2006. The next day, Balkenende offered the resignation of the full cabinet to the Dutch Queen.

He is a Senior Network Member at the European Leadership Network (ELN).[2]

Personal life[edit]

On 26 August 1960, Brinkhorst married Jantien Heringa (born 2 February 1935 in Voorburg), daughter of Ewardus Heringa (Den Haag, 14 November 1904 - Den Haag, 30 November 1988) and wife (m. Utrecht, 4 August 1930) Petronela Johanna Roskam (Utrecht, 20 August 1905 - Den Haag, 19 December 1991). Brinkhorst and Heringa are the parents of Marius Brinkhorst (born 9 February 1964) and the Dutch princess Laurentien Brinkhorst (born 25 May 1966), who married Prince Constantijn in 2001.[3]

Brinkhorst retired after spending 33 years in national politics and became active in the public sector and occupied numerous seats as a nonprofit director on several boards of directors and supervisory boards (Institute of International Relations Clingendael, Energy Research Centre, Netherlands Atlantic Association, Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Organisation for Scientific Research, Institute for Advanced Study and the Society for Statistics and Operations Research) and served as an diplomat and lobbyist for several economic delegations on behalf of the government and as an advocate and activist for Human rights, European integration, Environmentalism, Sustainable development and Climate change. Brinkhorst also served as a distinguished professor of Governmental studies, International relations, International law and European law at the Leiden University from 1 November 2006 until 1 November 2011 and a distinguished visiting professor of International relations and Environmental law at the University of Lausanne from 1 February 2007 until 1 February 2008.

Decorations[edit]

Honours
Ribbon bar Honour Country Date Comment
NLD Order of the Dutch Lion - Knight BAR.png Knight of the Order of the Netherlands Lion Netherlands 11 April 1978
Cordone di gran Croce OMRI BAR.svg Knight Grand Cross of the Order of Merit Italy 30 April 1985
BEL Order of Leopold II - Grand Cross BAR.png Grand Cross of the Order of Leopold II Belgium 15 May 1988
Ordre de la couronne de Chene Commandeur ribbon.svg Commander of the Order of the Oak Crown Luxembourg 25 January 1996 [4]
ESP Isabella Catholic Order COM NUM.svg Commander of the Order of Isabella the Catholic Spain 5 December 2000
DNK Order of Danebrog Grand Cross BAR.png Grand Cross of the Order of the Dannebrog Denmark 31 August 2003
AUT Honour for Services to the Republic of Austria - 6th Class BAR.png Grand Decoration of Honour in Gold of the
Decoration of Honour for Services
Austria 18 May 2004
GER Bundesverdienstkreuz 4 GrVK.svg Commander of the Order of Merit Germany 1 September 2004
POL Polonia Restituta Komandorski BAR.svg Commander of the Order of Polonia Restituta Poland 6 May 2005 [5]
JPN Kyokujitsu-sho 1Class BAR.svg Grand Cordon of the Order of the Rising Sun Japan 1 July 2005
NLD Order of Orange-Nassau - Grand Officer BAR.png Grand Officer of the Order of Orange-Nassau Netherlands 11 April 2007 Elevated from Officer (10 December 2002)
Legion Honneur Officier ribbon.svg Officer of the Legion of Honour France 4 July 2010 [6]

Honorary degrees[edit]

Honorary degrees
University Field Country Date Comment
Tilburg University Law Netherlands 5 July 2003

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Laurens Jan Brinkhorst". Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on 4 September 2017.
  2. ^ "Senior Network". www.europeanleadershipnetwork.org. Retrieved 21 September 2020.
  3. ^ Geneall
  4. ^ Journal of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg: Administrative and Economic Collection, No. 1, 15 January 1996 - Archive.org
  5. ^ Order of the President of the Republic of Poland - Polish Internet System of Legal Acts
  6. ^ Laurens Jan BRINKHORST , Officier de la Légion d’Honneur - website of the Ambassade de France à La Haye

External links[edit]

Official
Party political offices
Preceded by
Jan Terlouw
Parliamentary leader of the
Democrats 66 in the
House of Representatives

1981–1982
Succeeded by
Maarten Engwirda
Leader of the Democrats 66
1982
Political offices
Preceded by
Tjerk Westerterp
State Secretary for Foreign Affairs
1973–1977
Served alongside: Pieter Kooijmans
Succeeded by
Durk van der Mei
Preceded by
Klaas de Vries
Ad interim
Minister of Agriculture,
Nature and Fisheries

1999–2002
Succeeded by
Cees Veerman
Preceded by
Hans Hoogervorst
Minister of Economic Affairs
2003–2006
Succeeded by
Gerrit Zalm
Ad interim
Preceded by
Thom de Graaf
Deputy Prime Minister
2005–2006
Served alongside: Gerrit Zalm
Succeeded by
Gerrit Zalm
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Leslie Fielding
Ambassador of the European
Union to Japan

1982–1987
Succeeded by
Dries van Agt